Tag Archives: goodness

Admiral David Farragut, best remembered for his courage at Mobile Bay in 1864, listened as Admiral Samuel Dupont listed the reasons why he failed to get his fleet into Charleston Harbor and win the battle. When Dupont finished his explanation, Admiral Farragut replied, "There is one reason more. You did not believe you could."

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An automobile accident ten days before his high school graduation Shane Vermoort classified as a quadriplegic. A friend was killed in the accident.
All of his life, Shane had wanted to be a doctor. But was it still possible for him as a quadriplegic - or was it really the impossible dream?
Shane went through a year of rehabilitation and then went to Southern Illinois University, where he received a B.A. in physiology. His goal was medical school, but he was rejected time and again by medical schools all over America.
Eventually, he was accepted at the Medical College of Georgia. He excelled in his preparation and received the Clinical Neuroscience Award, was elected president of the Medical Honor Society, and became the first student to graduate from the college in a wheelchair. Shane reflects, "People have a tendency to reflect on what we don't have. If people would just look in the mirror and focus on the good things, they would be a lot better off."

Shane is telling all of us not to look down in despair on what we don't have but to look up in hope and use what we do have. It certainly worked for him and I'm convinced it will work for you. 
1. Today I will review my positive qualities and will be grateful for the talents and abilities I have.
2. Today I will ______________.

To look at him today you would find it difficult to believe that in August, 1974, Clarence Gass awoke unable to breath. However, the forty-one-year-old eventually regained his breath.
His breath problem that August night was no mystery. He was going through three and a half packs of cigarettes and twenty-four cans of beer a day. He stopped weighing at the 265-pound mark when he had a forty-three-inch waist. That very morning, after his frightening experience, Clarence Gass got down on his knees and asked God to help him. 
He quit drinking and smoking. He began to walk and then jog every night. Before the year was out, he was jogging four to five miles a day. Clarence went from more than 265 pounds to 150 pounds. His blood pressure dropped from 150 over 100 to 120 over 72. He has now run in ten marathons. 
According to Gass, "It takes more courage than you can imagine for a fat person to get out and run in front of other people. It's a slow process and you must be patient. But it is possible. You can do it! Don't quit!

                           

Think about it: the odds are great that your physical condition is not as bad and your personal habits are not nearly as destructive as Clarence Gass's were in 1974. However, the odds are even greater that his physical condition and personal habits are both better than yours today. The question is this: If Clarence Gass can change to health and activity is there any real reason why you can't? 
1. Today I will remember to ask for God's help in all my activities.
2. Today, I will exercise in some fashion. It ay be for five minutes or for one hour, but I will exercise today.
3. Today I will _____________________________.