Tag Archives: fear

Fear is a poor chisel for carving out tomorrow. Today, if you are viewing your future from a position of fear or worry, I want to let you know that view is not accurate or correct. Instead, view your future from a position of faith. That's the truth. Worry is simply the triumph of fear over faith.
There is a story about a woman crying profusely and standing on a street corner. A man came up to her and asked why she was weeping. The lady shook her head and replied: "I was just thinking that maybe someday I would get married. We would later have a beautiful baby girl. then one day this child and I would go for a walk along this street, and my darling daughter would run into the street, get hit by a car, and die."
It sounds like a pretty ridiculous situation - weeping because of something that will probably never happen. Yet we act this way when we worry. We blow a situation out of proportion that might not ever come to pass.
An old Swedish proverb says: "Worry gives a small thing a big shadow." Worry is simply the misuse of the creative imagination that God has placed within each of us. When fear rises in our minds, we should learn to expect the opposite in our lives. The opposite of fear is faith.
The worry is derived from an Anglo-Saxon term meaning to strangle or to choke off. There is no question that worry and fear do choke off the creative flow from God. The less you worry, the more ideas, insight, and revelation you will have.
Things are seldom as they seem. "Skim milk masquerades as cream," said W.S. Gilbert. As we dwell on and worry about matters beyond our control, a negative effect begins to set in. Too much analysis always leads to paralysis. Worry is a route that leads from somewhere to nowhere. Never let it direct your life.
In Psalm 55:22 the Bible says, "Cast thy burden upon the Lord, and he shall sustain thee: He shall never suffer the righteous to be moved." Never respond out of fear, and never fear to respond. Action attacks fear; inaction reinforces it.
Don't worry and don't fear. Instead, take your fear and worry to the Lord, "casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you." (1 Peter 5:7)
(From John L. Mason's "An Enemy Called Average")

Status Quo (Latin for "THE MESS WE'RE IN")

Change. I hope this word doesn't scare you, but rather inspires you. Herbert Spencer said, "A living thing is distinguished from a dead thing by the multiplicity of the changes at any moment taking place in it." Change is an evidence of life. It is impossible to grow without change. Those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything. The truth is, life is always at some turning point. 

What people want is progress, if they can have it without change. Impossible! You must change and recognize that change is your greatest ally. The person who never changes his opinion never corrects his mistakes. The fact is the road to success is always under construction.
Yesterday's formula for success is often tomorrow's recipe for failure. Consider what Thomas Watson, the founder of the IBM Corporation, said, "There is a world market for about five computers." Where would IBM be today if Mr. Watson had not been willing to change?
You cannot become what you are destined to be by remaining what you are. John Patterson said, "Only fools and dead men don't change their minds. Fools won't. Dead men can't." If you don't respect the need for change, consider this: How many things have you seen that have changed just in the past year? When you change yourself, opportunities will change. The same kind of thinking that has brought you where you are will not necessarily get you where you want to go.
Do not fear change, for it is an unchangeable law of progress. The man who uses yesterday's methods in today's world won't be in business tomorrow. A traditionalist is simply a person whose mind is always open to new ideas, provided they are the same old ones. Odell Shepard observed, "There are people who not only strive to remain static themselves, but strive to keep everything else so. . . their position is almost laughably hopeless."
Mignon McLaughin said, "It's the most unhappy people who most fear change." When patterns and tradition are broke, new opportunities come together. Defending your faults and errors only proves that you have no intention of quitting them. All progress is due to those who were not satisfied to let well enough alone. They weren't afraid to change. Change is not your enemy - it is your friend.
(From John L. Mason's "An Enemy Called Average" if you want more of these, please buy the book. I gave you the title and author here.)

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Shortly after Mr. Darby received his degree from the "University of Hard Knocks" and had decided to profit by his experience in gold mining business, he had the good fortune to be present on an occassion that proved to him that "No" does not necessarily mean no.
One afternoon he was helping his uncle grind wheat in an old-fashioned mill. The uncle operated a large farm on which a number of colored child, the daughter of a tenant, walked in and took her place near the door.
The uncle looked up, saw the child, and barked at her roughly "What do you want?"
Meekly, the child replied, "My mammy say send her fifty cents."
"I'll not do it," the uncle retorted, "now you run on home."
"Yas sah," the child replied. But she did not move.
The uncle went ahead with his work, so busily engaged that he did not pay attention to the child to observe that she did not leave. When he looked up and saw her still standing there, he yelled at her, "I told you to go on home! Now go, or I'll take a switch to you."
The little girl said "Yas sah," but she did not budge.
The uncle dropped a sack of grain he was about to pour into mill hopper, picked up a barrel stave, and started toward the child with an expression on his face that indicated trouble.
Darby held his breath. He was certain he was about to witness an assault. He knew his uncle had a fierce temper. 
When the uncle reached the spot where the child was standing, she quickly stepped forward one step, looked up into his eyes, and screamed at the top of her shrill voice, "My mammy's gotta have that fifty cents!"
The uncle stopped, looked at her for a minute, then slowly laid the barrel stave on the floor, put his hand in his pocket, took out half a dollar, and gave it to her.
The child took the money and slowly backed toward the door, never taking her eyes offthe man whom she had just conquered. After she had gone, the uncle sat down on a box and looked out the window into space for more than ten minutes. He was pondering, with awe, over the whipping he had just taken.
Mr. Darby, too, was doing some thinking. That was the first time in all his experience that he had seen a colored child deliberately master an adult white person. How did she do it? What happpened to his uncle that caused him to lose his fierceness and become as docile as a lamb? What strange power did this child use that made her master of the situation? These and other similar questions flashed into Darby's mind, but he did not find the answer until years later, when he told me the story.
Strangely, the story of this unusual experience was told to the author in the old mill, on the very spot where the uncle took his whipping.

As we stood there in that musty old mill, Mr. Darby repeated the story of unusual conquest, and finished by asking, "What can you make of it? What strange power did that child use, that so completely whipped my uncle?"

The answer to his question will be found in the principles described by the author in his book. The answer is full and complete. It contains details and instructions sufficient to enable anyone to understand and apply the same force which the little child accidentally stumbled upon.

Keep your mind alert, and you will observe exactly what strange power came to the rescue of the child. You will catch a glimpse of this power in the next chapter (posts of this blog). Somewhere in the book you will find an idea that will quicken your receptive powers, and place at your command, for your own benefit, this same irresistible power. The awareness of this power may come to you in the first chapter. The awareness of this power may come to you in the first chapter, or it may flash into your mind in some subsequent chapter (blog). It may come in the form of a single idea. Or, it may come in the nature of a plan, or a purpose. Again, it may cause you to go back into your past experiences of failure or defeat, and bring to the surfacesome lesson by which you can regain all that yuou lost through defeat.

After I had described to Mr. Darby the power unwittingly used by the little colored child, he quickly retraced his thirty years of experience as a life insurance salesman, and frankly acknowledged that his success in that field was due, in no small degree, to the lesson he had learned from the child. 

Mr. Darby pointed out: "Every time a prospect tried to bow me out, without buying, I saw that child standing there in the old mill, her big eyes glaring in defiance, and I said to myself: 'I've gotta make this sale!" The better portion of all sales I have made were made after people had said "No."

He recalled too, his mistake in having stopped only three feet from gold, "But" he sad, "that experience was a blessing in disguise. It taught me to keep on keeping on, no matter how hard the going may be, a lesson I needed to learn before I could succeed in anything."

(Story from Napoleon Hill's "Think and Grow Rich")