Tag Archives: don’t quit

Don't quit. There is a big difference between quitting and changing, however. I believe that when God sees someone who does not quit, He looks down and says, "There is someone I can use."
In Galatians 6:9 (NIV) we are told, "Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up." Look at this verse carefully. It urges us not to become weary, assuring us that we will - not might, will - reap a harvest of if we do not give up.
God does not quit. It is impossible for him to do so. In Philippians 1:6 (NIV) the Apostle Paul writes about "being confident of this, that he who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus." There are several important points in this verse. The most crucial is the fact that God does not quit. Therefore, we can have great confidence that He will complete the good work He has begun in us. He will see us through every step until we reach our ultimate destination.
One of the best scriptural examples of a person who did not quit is Joseph. He had many reasons to justify giving up. When he was trapped in the pit where his brothers had thrown him because of their jealousy, I am sure he said to himself, "This is not the way  I dreamed my life would work out!" Later, he had a marvelous opportunity to become discouraged adn quit when he was thrown into prison for a crime he did not commit. Again he could have said to himself, "This is not right; I'm not supposed to be here." Although Joseph did not understand the steps through which the Lord would lead him, he remained true to his God. Despite the trials he faced, he did not quit. Eventually the dream that God had given Joseph became reality. he was elevated from a prisoner to a prime minister in one day!
There is no greater reward than that which comes as a result of holding fast to the word and to the will of God. Only you can decide not to lose. Most people quit when they are on the verge of success. Often, success was at their fingertips. There is only one degree of difference between hot water and steam. 
In Luke 18 (NIV) Jesus told the parable of the persistent widow. The Bible reveals His purpose in relating this story. Verse 1 says, "Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them they should always pray and not give up." The psalmist tells us, "Commit thy way unto the Lord; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass." (Psalm 37:5).
The only way we can lose is to quit. Quitting is the only decision we can make that can keep us from reaching God's goals in our lives.

Shortly after Mr. Darby received his degree from the "University of Hard Knocks" and had decided to profit by his experience in gold mining business, he had the good fortune to be present on an occassion that proved to him that "No" does not necessarily mean no.
One afternoon he was helping his uncle grind wheat in an old-fashioned mill. The uncle operated a large farm on which a number of colored child, the daughter of a tenant, walked in and took her place near the door.
The uncle looked up, saw the child, and barked at her roughly "What do you want?"
Meekly, the child replied, "My mammy say send her fifty cents."
"I'll not do it," the uncle retorted, "now you run on home."
"Yas sah," the child replied. But she did not move.
The uncle went ahead with his work, so busily engaged that he did not pay attention to the child to observe that she did not leave. When he looked up and saw her still standing there, he yelled at her, "I told you to go on home! Now go, or I'll take a switch to you."
The little girl said "Yas sah," but she did not budge.
The uncle dropped a sack of grain he was about to pour into mill hopper, picked up a barrel stave, and started toward the child with an expression on his face that indicated trouble.
Darby held his breath. He was certain he was about to witness an assault. He knew his uncle had a fierce temper. 
When the uncle reached the spot where the child was standing, she quickly stepped forward one step, looked up into his eyes, and screamed at the top of her shrill voice, "My mammy's gotta have that fifty cents!"
The uncle stopped, looked at her for a minute, then slowly laid the barrel stave on the floor, put his hand in his pocket, took out half a dollar, and gave it to her.
The child took the money and slowly backed toward the door, never taking her eyes offthe man whom she had just conquered. After she had gone, the uncle sat down on a box and looked out the window into space for more than ten minutes. He was pondering, with awe, over the whipping he had just taken.
Mr. Darby, too, was doing some thinking. That was the first time in all his experience that he had seen a colored child deliberately master an adult white person. How did she do it? What happpened to his uncle that caused him to lose his fierceness and become as docile as a lamb? What strange power did this child use that made her master of the situation? These and other similar questions flashed into Darby's mind, but he did not find the answer until years later, when he told me the story.
Strangely, the story of this unusual experience was told to the author in the old mill, on the very spot where the uncle took his whipping.

As we stood there in that musty old mill, Mr. Darby repeated the story of unusual conquest, and finished by asking, "What can you make of it? What strange power did that child use, that so completely whipped my uncle?"

The answer to his question will be found in the principles described by the author in his book. The answer is full and complete. It contains details and instructions sufficient to enable anyone to understand and apply the same force which the little child accidentally stumbled upon.

Keep your mind alert, and you will observe exactly what strange power came to the rescue of the child. You will catch a glimpse of this power in the next chapter (posts of this blog). Somewhere in the book you will find an idea that will quicken your receptive powers, and place at your command, for your own benefit, this same irresistible power. The awareness of this power may come to you in the first chapter. The awareness of this power may come to you in the first chapter, or it may flash into your mind in some subsequent chapter (blog). It may come in the form of a single idea. Or, it may come in the nature of a plan, or a purpose. Again, it may cause you to go back into your past experiences of failure or defeat, and bring to the surfacesome lesson by which you can regain all that yuou lost through defeat.

After I had described to Mr. Darby the power unwittingly used by the little colored child, he quickly retraced his thirty years of experience as a life insurance salesman, and frankly acknowledged that his success in that field was due, in no small degree, to the lesson he had learned from the child. 

Mr. Darby pointed out: "Every time a prospect tried to bow me out, without buying, I saw that child standing there in the old mill, her big eyes glaring in defiance, and I said to myself: 'I've gotta make this sale!" The better portion of all sales I have made were made after people had said "No."

He recalled too, his mistake in having stopped only three feet from gold, "But" he sad, "that experience was a blessing in disguise. It taught me to keep on keeping on, no matter how hard the going may be, a lesson I needed to learn before I could succeed in anything."

(Story from Napoleon Hill's "Think and Grow Rich")